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for the good of others gets the ultimate tribute here in new york city. a live report from the u.s.s. michael murphy and incredible story behind this massive destroyer. stay tuned. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8... and there's a big advantage parents can give their kids -- making sure they get active at least 60 minutes each day. studies show that physical activity not only helps kids stay healthy, it can enhance important skills, like concentration and problem solving, which can improve academic performance. this means physical activity can help your kids in the most important game of all -- life. makes it easy for anne to manage her finances when she's on the go. even when she's not going anywhere. citibank for ipad. easier banking. standard at citibank. helps him deposit his checks. jay also like it when mother nature helps him wash his car. mother nature's cool like that. mobile check deposit. easier bankin
presentation will be michael from "time" magazine to give the land scape in politics and what's happening. i'll run through a little -- some of the questions that i think we might m to be asking, the beyond sticker shock questions, do that quickly, and then we'll -- and then we'll be joined by trevor potter, katherine -- trevor potter, a partner in captain and drive, and dale. we know him for years, but now the world knows him, and katherine maggie ward is a fellow here at new america and editing manager of "reason" magazine. in addition to moderating, she can provide provocation which is useful. with no further adieu, thank you, all, for coming, and i'll tern it over to michael. >> i wonder who knew trevor when he was a lawyer for john mccain, an important job, nothing like being a lawyer for steven cobehr. maybe one day i can work for comedy central and people can be impressed. a brief overview. this is a graphic we ran in "time" at the end of july this summer trying the best at that moment in time to project out where the money was comes from and what the difference would be in terms of v
these contributions continue for years to come. i will stop here and allow michael to give you more details. thank you for your support of america's aviation system and keeping this economic engine running at full throttle. >> administrator? >> good morning jarman mica, chairman petrie, ranking member costello and members of the committee. as you heard from deputy secretary porcari, nextgen is happening now. it's not something we are doing alone. it's a public-private partnership that will enhance the safety of our aviation system and lay the groundwork for the united states to continue to operate the safest aviation system in the world. i needed a pre-ready to step up our collaboration with our stakeholders externally to increase the focus on nextgen and to bring benefits to the travelling public now. the faa has a long history of engaging with industry to develop consensus are not policy, programs and regulatory decisions. we have worked closely with our industry partners such as rtca and have incorporated important advice from that organization in our nextgen planning. we also established a broad b
-- in "60 minutes." michael wallace points his finger and says you're a dictator. several times he said that. he laughed. after many years, people thought his approach was very smart. it made michael wallace embarrassed. if you do the same thing with xi jinping, it will be a disaster. we need to know this kind of mindset, this kind of experience. that is why what henry kissinger said early on this important. -- is important. it will shape their point of view and their behavior. there is tremendous room for cooperation but also dangerous. >> i think you said they experienced during the cultural revolution hard in this generation. how does this bear out in how they view domestic policies and -- in china? or is not -- that not a factor? >> we cannot really know how they will perform an office because they are not there yet. there have been instances where people, where china was being criticized and he made a sharp response. i have had several conversations with xi and found him an extraordinarily thoughtful person who raised a number of philosophical questions. the problem they face is if you
deliberately chose michael carr as one of the scientists to interview for my book was he retired -- because he retired right after he was at jpl. so to see that kind of transition. >> uh-huh. let's talk about the dangers of anthroto moretizing our rovers as we put them up there. i was following the tweets of the martian -- of curiosity, and ask sometimes they bridged into the adult. and it was great fun, it was wonderful, but as soon as you start injecting that humanity, you -- a lot of people get in trouble on twitter. [laughter] i was wondering about how much of a burden it is to say, oh, now this is as much our mascot as it is our scientist. >> well, i think that is the truth. and that was probably my biggest surprise in going through my work over these eight years, because i did start, as i said, rather upset when i first saw that 2001 press release. i was at hart and rater in july when it came out, and i remember ranting and raving to anyone who would listen to me who is this steve squires, and why is he saying these on sudden things? robot wick geologists, we're in -- robotic geologists,
. in 1988, michael dukakis could have had help not looking so cold in his response. >> we have a professor at the george washington university, john sides. when you have those moments that reinforce a marriage, either good or for ill, to a candidate, how important or damaging can these be? >> candidate debates in a general election to not move the polls a general -- a lot. race.in a close debat in general, i think these dramatic moments in debates are not necessarily game changes for the average american voter. >> you wrote, usually the candidates fight to a drawl. . it is hard in that context to have a stunning victory or a terrible defeat. can you elaborate? >> the candidates spend a lot of time trying to lower their expectations about the performance and portray the other person as this great orator . in reality, the candidates spend a lot of time prepping for the debates and they are very good at it. they have read a lot of material and memorize a lot of material. in that context, it is hard for a candidate to really make a big enough mistake to actually swing opinion too strongly to h
. michael, why don't you weigh in on this. you hear what jemma is saying. i've been surprised at how the market has brushed off europe. do worry it will come back into the forefront? >> absolutely. well done cnbc. no one covering europe and sorting it out better than jemma. we follow her closely. and i would break with a lot of that. and for us a lot of it here in the markets are strictly just pivot points. you mentioned 1.29. there's a lot of traders that wonder why we're still up at these levels or even coming off of a breach of 1.30 when the market sleclearly has a differe perception. particularly there are markets that we watch that show where the growth is going and right now crude oil is one of them because we're below 89 and holding it from a demand perspective and then there's a whole component of where is the worry and all of a sudden gold is getting ready to breach 1800. i think if you mix all of that together, you're starting to understand that the hurdle in the middle of the track right now being the payroll number is really going to be not necessarily a deciding factor,
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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